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20121231
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in asia and africa and the americas or do you basically surrender to decline? and i think that requires very tough choices about the time and energy and education systems and welfare systems and being not prepared to tolerate poor performance. >> rose: and rick stengel, managing editor of "time" magazine talking about "time" magazine's person of the year. >> i always like to feel the person who wins person of the year it's both backward looking in terms of the year past and forward looking in terms of what that person will do in the next year and beyond and obama is a perfect example of that. the next america is the america of today. which is why in effect he's person of the year. because he's the architect of this new america and i actually think it's a great thing because it's a more tolerant america, a more diverse america. >> rose: osborne and stengel. next. caioning spoored by roseommunications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: george osborne is here. he is britain's chancellor of the exchequer. he has been called the austerity chancellor. he continu
. >> reporter: in most of america, u.p.s. drivers spend a lot of time behind the wheel. not tony. he parks his truck less than two miles away for the whole day. >> i prefer to park and uh let my legs do the work, you know what i mean? >> reporter: today, tony is lucky to have the help of angel tirado, a seasonal worker. so, it's angel who delivers dozens of heavy boxes to a garment warehouse. meanwhile, tony minds the truck and gets ready for the next delivery, offering up some tips of the trade: like the importance of making friends in the buildings. >> at least once a week, every one of my freight guys, they're going to get a coffee from me. once in a while, you know, i'll go get like a couple of sandwiches. i mean, they make my life a whole lot easier. i want them liking me! >> reporter: after a while, i persuade tony to let me deliver two packages to a building across the street. that means, i'm also responsible for the diad-- the electronic clipboard tracking all the packages. i have two packages for you. >> great. >> reporter: and i need you to sign. with that, my visit is over. but tony
? >> historically russia has been one of the most popular sending countries to america. right now china is the leading country. russia is certainly in the top 5 with over 700,000 orphans in that country. there's certainly plenty of children who need a loving family here in the united states. >> suarez: how about that side of the story. unicef estimate there is's only about 18,000 russian families looking to adopt children. that's a disproportionate number considering the need for new homes. >> it is. last year alone here in america there were a thousand children adopted from russia. there are many american families, many of whom right now are in the process of adopting these children that are willing, ready, and able to adopt these kids, some of which have severe special needs. so it speaks to the heart of esamerican families that are willing to adopt these kids and bring them home. the. >> suarez: but there have been unfortunate stories that have gotten a lot of attention here in the united states and back in russia >> does that make things more difficult for your organization and othe
♪ ♪ ♪ >> this week on "moyers and company" -- the scheme to remake america, one statehouse at a time. >> politicians and corporate representatives, corporate lobbyists were actually voting behind closed doors on these changes to the law before they were introduced in statehouses across the country. >> the united states of alec. and perfidious and passionate poetry from philip appleman. >> money buys prophets and teachers, poems and art. so, listen, if you're so rich, why aren't you smart? >> funding is provided by -- carnegie corporation of new york. celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine
the largest collection in america. we are joined by dr. the curator and department head of literacy and historical manuscripts at the morgan library. >> here we are in mr. morgan's study. we're looking at the first installments of david copperfield. one schilling would have got you your monthly part. and here is the beginning part of the booklets and it is just page after page after page of advertisements for books and pills and remedies and all kinds of things. here you have the original illustrations that accompany each part separated by tissue, of course, so they didn't smudge each other. here's the very first page of the narrative, whether i turn out to be tero of mywn fe or whether that station will be held by anybody else, these pages must show. >> people buy a dickens' novel they imagine of course that that's how they were written. but they weren't. they were written month by month. was it particular to dickens? >> it was really dickens who pioneered this and was the most successful perpetrator, if you will, of publishing in installments. >> i guess you're saying that these n
america? >> tom: i'm tom hudson. president obama tries to win over top business leaders, warning republicans are holding the global economy hostage over the fiscal cliff. >> susie: and apple shares get of the most widely owned stocks sees heavy trading. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r." >> susie: big job cuts today at one of the nation's biggest banks. citigroup announced it's slashing 4% of its staff; that works out to 11,000 jobs worldwide. the cuts will save the bank more than $1 billion a year in expenses. but they won't be cheap, resulting in a billion-dollar charge against fourth-quarter earnings. is this gloomy news from citi the beginning of other companies doing the same? suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: 11,000 jobs are a lot of layoffs, even for a bank as huge as citi. and there could be more. that's because the monster firm is still struggling to recover from the great recession even though it has fired a lot of other workers in the last few years. the thing is, citi has a new c.e.o. in michael corbat, and experts say he's anxious to make his mark, even if t
's problems in terms of interfaith dialogue will be resolved. >> it's very critical for america to have good reputation to have good liaison with the muslim world. >> we do hope that the president could maybe visit a mosque or attend an american muslim institution and really show that direct engagement, that hey, listen, you are part of the american framework and part of the building of this country. >> we're cautiously optimistic that the obama administration will finally allow sikhs to service in the u.s. armed forces with their articles of faith in tact. it would be a very important and historic step. >> we'd like to see the obama administration take the lead in acknowledging and including non-theistic americans in the decision making process. >> pro-life issues are always a concern. someone has to protect the innocent life and certainly we think our government ought to be able to do that. >> i also really hope and pray that in the second administration he takes on the issue of climate change. i think that unfortunately it's become a politicized, highly contentious issue and that it's not
be the exception rather than the rule. over the years, america's millions of physically, mentally, and emotionally disabled have made great strides in the workplace, but places of worship have lagged behind. jim hukill was diagnosed with muscular dystrophy when he was only 2. he has made it his life's mission to open more churches to the disabled. >> we are still ry much in an infantile state with the faith and disability movement. i think that we have seen over the last decade a significant advancement, but we are nowhere near what has to happen. >> reporter: places of worship and the disabled is the subject of a new book called "amazing gifts" by author mark pinsky. he says one stumbling block for people, whatever their faith, is that at first they feel awkward around people with disabilities. >> they say, "i don't know what to say. i don't know what to do. should i tell my kids not to stare?" all these things are okay, and people in the disability community recognize that there's going to be some unease, some initial discomfort. that's okay. that shouldn't discourage you from plunging ahead. >>
, proud to make america work. for more information about afge and membership, visit afge.org. >> production assistance for "inside washington" was provided by allbritton communications and politico, reporting on the legislative, executive, and political arena. >> here we are at the 11th hour, and the president still is in serious about dealing with this .ssue right here i it is this issue, spending. >> this week on "inside washington," more fiscal cliff notes. susan rice takes her name off the board. >> i did not want to see a confmation process that w ry prolonged, very politicized, very distracting, very destructive. >> what do you think will happen to assad? >> killed. >> michigan, the home of the united auto workers, now a right to work state. >> and they have been guarding the governor's office all day. >> the supreme court will tackle a marria -- gay marriage. >> it is about time. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> if we make it through december, everything will be all right. i would sing that for you, but i don't wish to offend mer
-- proud to make america work. for more informationbout afge and membership, visit afge.org. >> production assistance was provided by all but in communications and politico, reporting on the political and legislative arena. >> this week on "inside washington," the thrill of victory. >> barack obama has been reelected. >> the agony of defeat. >> this election is over, but our principles in north. >> the year 2012 in review. >> the supreme court has upheld the requirement that every american by health insurance. >> the year of the cliffhanger. >> raising tax rates is unacceptable. >> natural disasters. >> like the apocalypse. >> and human tragedies. >> saying someone is shooting in the auditorium. >> political fumbles. >> 5 seconds before you interrupted me. >> and shoppers. >> the seriousness of having a cia director involved in an extramarital affair cannot be overplayed. >> all right, as we look back, let's begin with the top political story of the year -- the freight -- the reelection of barack obama. as "ti" magine plus a cover story states, barack obama will be the first democrat in mo
best represent the upon population of the united states of america. we're very dwirs, but i think we need to show the nation that a group of people committed to the common good can come together and pass a law that's necessary for the public safety, whether you're in auralrea a suburban or urban area, we all have children. those of white house are parents understand how precious life is. we have a great poeet from illinois, carl sandberg who said, "the birth of a baby is god's opinion the world should go on." it's high time we protect our children, protect our babies from the harm of assault weapons and high-capacity ammunition magazines. >> ifill: do you have any sense that public opinion is shifting in your state? >> oh, i believe so. i don't think there's any question. ecdolly,ust visiti wit the people on the street-- i was at a daycare center today, an early-childhood center, and you can tell how committed moms and dads are to getting a law pads to protect their children. no matter where you live in america, children come first. the great thing about our country is parents sacrif
. fleischmann and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america,digning group, individual, and retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. >>> welcome. the bells rang for the lost. charlotte bacon, olivia engle, anna marquez green, catherine hubbard, emilie parker, jack pinto, noah posner, jssica ricos, benjamin wheeler, and allison wyatt. all were 6 years old. daniel barden and grace mcdonald were 7. six adults died with them. mary sherlock, dawn hochsprung, victoria soto. it helps to say their names to rescue them from the stistal anonymity that always settles over these awful events. it helps those of us distanced from the loss to imagine to even grieve the emptiness of the homes and hearts of those who loved them. we will never forget. we mourn, move on, and too soon forget. then it will happen again some day. we'll scratch our heads and ask ourselves, was the last time newtown or columbine? was it aurora or that college in virginia? once again, we will mourn, move on, and too soon forget. there is an old saying that in remembrance is the secret of redemption. but a
>> in america today, child poverty has reached record levels, with over 16 million children now affected. >> to us, it's just how we live. you don't get to make choices in how you live. >> one in 13 americans is now unemployed, and many children are growing up with little hope for their future. >> i'm surprised by how things can change so fast. you can go from doing okay to going hungry and on the verge of being homeless again. >> and we're going to start with numbers one through 20. >> food banks struggle to keep up with demand, and homeless shelters have long waiting lists, as even middle-income families sometimes lose their homes with just a few days' notice. >> if the tv can fit in your school bag, you can take it. if it didn't fit, you couldn't take it. >> we asked these children wht a life being poor in america really looks like, through their eyes. >> frontlinis made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major support for frontliis ovidedy thjohn. and catherine t. macarthur f
and by the charles a. frueauff foundation. >> this week on "to the contrary" first, gun control in america following the newtown, connecticut massacre. then, a look back at 2012 and ahead to the new year. hello, i'm bonnie erbe. not feeling too well but still standing. welcome to "to the contrary," a discussion of news and social trends from diverse perspectives. up first, more guns or fewer guns? gun control advocates hope to see a federal ban reinstated on assault weapons following the unspeakable massacre of 20 children and six adults last week in connecticut. but gun advocates are pitching new state laws that allow teachers to carry concealed weapons to school, and one state, virginia, is considering a bill to require teachers to carry weapons to work. president obama promised to make gun control a central issue for his next term. vice president joe biden is leading the administration effort to limit gun violence. early next month biden will deliver a set of specific legislative proposals for dollars tightening gun laws. so, conesswoman norton are guns in schools the answer? >> oh, bonnie. our c
are made and what drives those companies? tonight in this "n.b.r." special edition "made in america" we go to towns small and large to meet unique businesses building jobs and profits. that and more tonight on "n.b.r." good evening, i'm mike hegedus with an n.b.r. special edition, made in america. walking down kentucky street in downtown petaluma, california, but it could be anywhere, u.s.a. this is where small businesses live. small businesses that create two out of every three new jobs in the u.s. tonight you're going to meet some of the people behind those businesses and find out how they plan to keep building those businesses. we begin with the housing market, ground zero for the recession. from construction to appliance makers, when it collapsed it took a lot of very good companies down with it. but here's one that has managed to learn how to paint over the rough spots. you can brush it on, you can roll it on, you can get it on your pants. paint. the kelly moore plant in san carlos, california, turns out nearly 40,000 gallons a day. it's one of the largest employee-owned paint operati
view of jesus in america. we'll ask the author of american stephen broth row with another view on the live line. captions produced by visual audio captioning www.visualaudiocaptioning.com barack obama barac barack obama barack obama >> dr. stephen prothero, welcome. your book has a ctral proposition, what is the proposition in the book? >> i think there's two. one is that jesus is many and mal oohable, there isn't just one jesus but there's many and the other is that jesus isn't just for christians in the united states, christians love jesus but so do buddhists and jews and hindus and people without any religion whatsoever. >> the jesus image is multiadaptble because we are a 3489 religious nation. >> that's right, we're a multireligious nation but also a christian nation where 80% or so of the country are christians and they put je'us on the national agenda and then people of all different religions and without any at all respond to that figure. >> why did thomas jefferson become consumed with revising the bible by omitting a lot of it in his own text of the bible as you began
to hit america in the gut. i think impact would be really strong. if anybody thinks this is going to be a slope better wake up. >> ifill: the link between brain injury and sports, new evidence ties repeated blows to the head to long-term damage. we take a look. >> brown: ray suarez looks at the firestorm over israel's announcement it will expand settlements in the west bank. >> ifill: elizabeth brackett looks at how one chicago school is dealing with the transition to new state-wide standards. >> i really did find that the kids do understand more, and they learn more. they're more interested in what they're learning. >> brown: plus, as global carbon dioxide levels hit record highs, we analyze the increasing difficulty of combating climate change, with carol davenport of the "national journal." >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financi
. and that was especially true today. i know there's not a parent in america who doesn't feel the same overwhelming grief that i do. the majority of those who died today were children. beautiful little kids between the ages of 5 and 10 years old. they had their entire lives ahead of them. birthdays, graduations, weddings, kids of their own. among the fallen were also teachers, men and women who devoted their lives to helping our children fulfill their dreams. so our hearts are broken today. for the parents and grandparents, sisters and brothers of these little children. and for the family its of the adults who were lost. our hearts are broken for the parents of the survivors as well. for as bssed as they are to have their children home tonight, they know that their children's innocence has been torn away from them too early and there are no words that will ease their pain. as a country we have been through this too many times. whether it's a elementary school in newtown or a shopping mall in oregon, or a temp el in wisconsin, or a movie these never aurora or a street corner in chicago, these neighborhood
of america's history, the truly-- the biggest sin that the country committed and the sin that we're still paying for to this day, we haven't gotten past the sin. part of the reason we haven't gotten past it is we have to almost lie about it, lie by omission. and i wanted to throw out there on the table. i wanted to take a modern-day audience and stick them in the antebellum south and see what america america was like at that ti in that part country. and deal-- now, i want to do it in an entering way, and me the way to do that is to do it as a genre pies because it seems like most of the time-- whenever it has been dealt with, at least in the last 30 years or 40 years, it's been either historical with a capital "h" which i think kind of put it at an arm's distance, kinds of puts it a little bit under class, to observe and here are the facts. and we all know the facts, more or less, or ere's been movies like, "mandingo" or "good-bye uncle tom" which in many ways i think are much clorls to the truth than the capital "h"movies. so i wanted to do it like a-- an exciting western adventure. and
kennedy said i look forward to an america that will not be afraid of grace and bite. i look forward to an american that will honor achievement in the arts, the way we honor achievement in business or state craft. and that's what the kennedy center honors are. >> we conclude this evening with the stars and director of the new film, this is 40. joining us paul rudd, leslie mann and judd apatow. >> i think it is a couple that my own onion is tt they love each other and they're deal well problems that a lot of marriages deal with. and maybe they're just handling it in the wrong way sometimes. and i think they're kind of succumbing to the pressures of all of it. >> like paul said we kind of share a brain and so we, you know, we have a shorthand with each other, with all of it. and we have i mean we're constantly having conversations about what we are-- about screens and these characters. >> it is person. we debate all the time how truthful it is, and how personal it is. and some days it is like this is really personal, this isn't like us at all. so we change our opinion moment to moment,
breed in corporate america. we look at why so few c.e.o.'s are women. that and more, tonight on nbr. >> susie: not a very merry day of trading on wall street today. it was a holiday shortened session, and the investors and traders working on this half- day were playing it safe, especially with the fiscal cliff talks on holiday break as well. when the closing bell rang at 1:00 eastern time, the dow was down 51 points, the nasdaq lost eight, and the s&p was off 3 points. so while wall street worked half a day, washington was on vacation. lawmakers are increasingly pessimistic about a big agreement-- or any agreement-- being reached before the year ends. darren gersh has the latest. >> reporter: 'twas the night before christmas, and all through the house, nothing much was going on. it was the same story in the senate. washington's cliff talks still remain deadlocked. congress will return on thursday, and it's still possible a few days of holiday cheer and constituent outrage may push republicans and democrats to craft a last-minute agreement to avoid the worst of the fiscal cliff. if w
,000 people in america killed with guns. we've done nothing. i mean, you know, i don't know at what point you have to say enough is enough. we've been killing 34 americans every single day. that's bigger than virginia tech. every single day. and you done cover it because it's 34 separate occurrences arod the country. and it dsn't grab the public's imagination, psyche, sympathy, there's just-- you don't get a visceral reaction when it's people you don't know and can't see. >> rose: have we got that now, the visceral reaction that this is somehow different because it children. >> i sure hope so i was asked today is it different with children. it is in the public psyche. but i think if you talk to the families of teenagers and even adults who were killed before the sympathyes with their loss isexactly the same as the parents of yog people. but youngeop th people look and say oh my god what are we really doing here. >> rose: what is your criticism of the president of the united states? >> well, i don't know that criticism is the right word. i believe that his job is to lead. when you tell me that
serving america with a great dedication every day in diplomatic posts around the world. >> brown: spending versus saving: amid the last-minute holiday rush, paul solman weighs the economic benefits. >> holiday season grand central terminal and a key question: is consumerism kind of a bad thing that's overdone this time of year? or is it the key driving economic and moral force in our society? >> suarez: and we close with another in our series of interviews with newly elected congressional members. tonight, north dakota's senator- elect, democrat heidi heitkamp. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the gine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station f
so they can continue to do what they do. >> you know, we do exaggerate in america all the time. so now we are locavore, you know local food and now we get totally crazy with organic to the point where i have been to restaurants where they practically come and introduce you to the carrot. that carrot was born on the 7th of may, we named it hilda. we can get exaggerated. too. >> rose: great chefs for an hour captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: let me start off. tell me what makes -- what makes a great restaurant? how do you -- >> well, what makes a great restaurant i don't know exactly. a great restaurant i think is where the owner and the chef gives all the love he can. >> rose: when does your day start? >> ooh, sometimes 8:00, sometimes 9:00, sometimes 7:00. >> rose: what's the first thing you do? >> oh, it changes a little bit. i stop at the office for 15 minutes and then i go down and look if everything is holding and look -- >> rose: see i had this impression of all of you at the fish market at 4:00 a.m. e
in seoul. moving into the americas then. you had relatively calm day in the northwest but windy conditions will return to the west as the new system comes in from the pacific. intensifying showers with the coastaareas. increasing sea for the northern rock kips. 90 centimeters in. we have blizzard warnings. moderate snowfall for ontario as well as quebec. rain showers intensifying over the ohio and tennessee valley. rain also spreading into toronto as well as new york city within the next 24 hours. relatively warm downowar t south. very chilly in winnipeg. minus 15 degrees on your friday. finally let's go over to europe. severe weather continues in the eastern half of the mediterranean countries. turkey will see the heaviest rain today. wet and windy conditions for the british isle. watch out for icy conditions. rain will spread into italy into tomorrow. lots of blue and white indicating near sub zero temperatures. here is the exthe eended foreca. >> thanks for joining us. to wrap up this edition of "newsline" we go where an annual event is underway to commemorate a tragic earthquake that o
six or nine months one of these incidents happening in america makes me say, you know, enough is enough. there's got to be a rational way to sort through this. i'm not saying i've got a perfect piece of legislation. i don't think the is a single perfect piece of legislation. but in a country where we got 30,000 gun deaths a year, there's got to be a way that we can do a bit more. i hope that responsible gun owners around america will join in this conversation as well. i think we have to recognize that it is about rational appropriate gun rules but also about mental health issues. my hope is our country takes a deep breath and doesn't just mply ge exercid by thisor a few moments and then push this horrible tragedy back into the background and forget about it. >> ifill: assuming that there is is not one single solution here, let's talk about what you mean when you say rational gun control. senator feinstein says an assault weapons ban would be rational. would you agree with that? >> i think that from the evidence i've seen that a lot of the challenge comes around the speed by wh
in a theme about a show thematically called "creative america." so they were very brightly colored. had to be seen from a large distance. but i feel that they have such a spectacular impact in terms of introducing the whole idea of the show, of regarding -- he is regarding us. he is the great regarder, if you will. he was the voyeur, they was receiver. and he is looking at us. but in this very enigmatic portrait where he's half covered in shadow. his hands in front of his face. so many of his depictions, warhol said "i paint myself to make sure i'm still here." and he's one of his favorite subjects but often his face is obscured. he's wearing sunglasses, he's wearing a wig, he's wearing makeup. so it inoduces warh i think in the best possible way. >> and you can't go wrong with portraits. (laughter) >> rose: says from the master. let's see the next image. >> well, this is one of the images taken from the newspaper of a nose job, an ad for nose jobs and warhol himself had a nose job and he was obsessed by his own apparent appearance. but this introduced the exhibition having to do with t
that in retailing in america. >> reporter: stores like sur la table are expected to be one of the few bright spots in an otherwise lackluster holiday season for merchants. in fact, some experts think home goods will be hotter than toys this holiday season. ibm projects home goods will see the strongest sales growth this year, up over 6%. that's far more than toys and electronics. >> you may ask yourself, why home? we think home is up because of a lot of things-- things like the changing demographic of the home itself. there's a stat that says that 41% of those between 25 and 29 are living back at home. >> reporter: but there also a second reason. >> we think that this holiday people are buying what they need vs. what they want. >> reporter: which had me wondering what's on jack schwefel's wish list this holiday season. it wasn't this $5,500 coffee maker. >> there are some new knives that i'm actually pretty excited about, so probably those. they're cutting board material actually used in the handle of the knives. >> reporter: and there's no denying it will look good sur la table at this holiday se
for america's highest earners, house republicans strongly oppose: >> instead of reforming the tax code and cutting spending, the president wants to raise tax rates. but even if the president got the tax rate hike that he wanted, understand that we would continue to see trillion dollar deficits for as far as the eye can see. washington's got a spending problem, not a revenue problem. >> tom: congress and the president have 24 days to reach a deal, before the fiscal cliff's tax hikes and spending cuts take effect. >> susie: mark zandi says "bad things will happen to the economy pretty fast" if lawmakers don't settle the fiscal cliff issue. he's chief economist of moody's analytics. so mark falling off the fiscal cliff means bad things. how bad? >> it could be quite bad, susie. i don't think it's if we get into january and we haven't settled this but if house mars haven't nailed thi down by early february, i think stock investors, bond investors will start to get very very nervous, start selling, risky businesses pull back and by the end of february when we start approaching the ceiling f
an extended rally. bank of america, for example. today's 2.9% rally comes on top of a huge jump this year. b-of-a shares have more than doubled since january, and they continue to break out to 18- month highs on stronger than average volume. after the close, the market focus was on research in motion. with its newest blackberry device due out early next year, the stock has been rallying, even as the company continues to lose money. but the silver lining is that it didn't lose as much money as feared in its latest quarter, and it generated more revenue than was anticipated. on its conference call tonight, the company said the quarter was a reflection of "the successful transition the company is making," even though it acknowledged losing one million blackberry device customers. investors and traders have been betting on the transition. the stock was up 3.6% during the regular session, closing at its highest price since march. and then, in extended hours trading after reporting its quarterly results, the stock added another 7%, trading over $15 per share. another stock to watch tomorrow will b
would, as a parent. and that was especially true today. i know there's not a parent in america who doesn't feel the same overwhelming grief that i do. the majority of those who died today were children. beautiful little kids between the ages of five an ten years old. they had their entire lives ahead of them. birthdays, graduations, weddings, kids of their own. among the fallen were also teachers, men and women without devoted their lives to helping our children fulfill their dreams. so our hearts are broken today. for the prentnd grandparents, sisters and brothers of these little children, and for the families of the adults who were lost. our hearts are broken for the parents of the survivors as well. for as blessed as they are to have their children home tonight, they know that their children's innocence has been torn away from them too early. and there are no words that will ease their pain. as a country we have been through this too many times. whether it'sin elementary school in newton or a shopping mall in oregon or a temp el in wisconsin, or a movie these never aurora or a street
choice for america's next secretary of state, john kerry. in a sense, john's entire life has prepared him f this role. having served with valor in vietnam, he understands that we have a responsibility to use american power wisely, especially our military power. and he knows, from personal experience, that when we send our troops into harm's way, we must give them the sound strategy, a clear mission, and the resources that they need to get the job done. in an extraordinarily distinguished senate career and as chairman of the foreign relations committee, john has played a central role in every major foreign policy debate for nearly 30 years. as we turn the page on a decade of war, he understands that we've got to harness all elements of american power and ensure that they're working together-- diplomatic and development, economic and political, military and intelligence-- as well as the power of our values which inspire so many people around the world. he is not going to need a lot of on-the-job training. he has earned the respect and trust of his senate colleagues, democrats and republican
charter schools that aim to be the model-ts of education. >> america has lots of terrific schools. people open great schools every year, but they typically open just one. nobody has figured out how to mass produce high quality, cost effective schools. >> brown: we remember general norman schwarzkopf-- the man who commanded american-led forces in the persian gulf war known as "desert storm." >> warner: plus, mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the final weekend has now arrived before the fiscal cliff hits on new year's day and wit
average. moving into the americas, then, after days of stormy weather we're seeing drier conditions across the northwest. although we're seeing some light showers lingering in british columbia. parts of california and snow showers for the cascades and the northern rockies, not too severe. heavy rain, snow and strong winds battering central canada. that's moving toward the east. quebec will see blizzard-like conditions from your thursday. light showers for the southeast coast. other than that, dry and hot for this time of year to the south. 24n houston. 21 in oklahoma city. getting back to normal across the eastern seaboard. finally, let's go over to the european continent. lots of things are going on. frigid air is blanketing the north, producing snow showers for parts of the british isles, southern scandinavian peninsula. rain is intensifying over the iberian peninsula. storms affecting the central and east mediterranean because we have frigid air to the north colliding with warmer air from africa. severe weather will continue into your friday. temperatures are very chilly. only zero degr
believe in traditional values or morality or whether you're a post-modernist. you had the same america you had in 1972 when 75% of americans leave in homes where they're married. romney would have won in a landslide he. only 48% of americans are married and living in homes. when 53% of our babies that are now born to women under 30 are born out of wedlock, we're in deep trouble. >> for land the antidote to social problems is the return to religion. >> spiritual revival. i do not see us, the traditional values folks, winning this struggle without a spiritual revival that ripens into an awakening and culminating into a rep mags. the single greatest advantage, bob, that an american can have today and trumps all others is is to be born into a home with a mother and a father who stay married to each other. if you're born into such a home, it trumps religion. it trumps ethnicity. it trumps economic rank. it trumps iq. it trumps everything. yet, over half of our children have lost that home by the time they're 7. as far as i'm concerned, that's collective societal child abuse. >> land was very cl
temperature-wise. in tokyo we're looking at 12 degrees. over towards the americas still things are very messy across much of the southwest. this is due to this winter storm system, and it is going to be a very heavy snowmaker. that will be moving into the four corners. welcoming rain will perhaps be in the phoenix region, but the mountainside will perhaps see about 30 centimeters of snowfall in nevada and new mexico. colorado, you may see more than that, and southern california you'll still see those rain but higher elevations will possibly pack up 5 centimeters of snowfall. across much of the southeast, things are looking very clear and the temperatures are rising here in chicago. that's well above your average. in fact, people in chicago actually broke the record for the longest stretch with no measurable snowfall. you haven't seen snow since rch 4 lt year, so 283 days of no snow. we're wondering when that snow will start there, but freezing rain has impacted paris. it was a slippery day for us out there. still a slippery thing. look at this video. freezing rain creates icy roads yesterday,
>>> new and improved? the pharmaceutical industry in america is constantly researching and innovating. this makes it possible for the industry to market new medicine, all the time. but new is not necessarily improved. so says a brand new study funded by the british government. the study found that older, cheaper, generic drugs were treating mental illness were better across-the-board than newly marketed medications. when it comes to prescription drugs, how can you tell when new really means improved? we'll ask dr. sharon levine. >>> new study i referred doctor sharon levine, from san francisco, associated executive director of kaiser permanenty. that new study refers to schizophrenia and the new drug it was found is better than the existing drug, right? >> yes, that's right this. is a very important studdy and it demonstrated in a larg population that the older antipsychotic drug, heldol, was more affective than the newer category called a typical antipsychotics. and it really speaks to the fact that we have a buys, all of us, consumers, physicians, we assume that new m
it shouldn't be any class, it should be america coming together and right now in our house that's a big cause of debate. >> reporter: but washington isn't a source of optimism these days. >> if they make a deal it certainly won't be a good one, they'll say this is something we've got to get done and i don't think it's going to be using any brain power to do it. >> reporr: aeadyhere is growing talk in washington of a so-called mini-deal. >> let's hope they do. the president was serious. he was friendly in the statement he made-- >> he's going on vacation. he's going to hawaii. >> susan: yeah, but there's an urgency here, and do you think we are going to be any closer to getting a deal done? >> the president really scaled back his ambitio for the immediate time. he said, look, guys, nancy pelosi, come back, try to do the minimum, try to do the least amount of harm. and then come up with some way to say that we'll address bigger issues in the new year. >> he proposed tonight a smaller package, a smaller deal. what will this mean for the economy? what will it mean for the deficit if this small d
on this for you. here across the americas, for your christmas day severe outbreak is still in store across the gulf coast. this could be a deadly one due to the tornadic activities. we already have 14 reportsf tornadoes in the past 24 hours, and also hail have been reported too. this is going to be shifting toward the southeastern areas and toward the northeast. this is your boxing day outlook. toward the north, heavy snow will be piling up. and toward the west here another pacific system will be reaching. so the coastal heavy rain. and the sierras possibly will look at a total of 50 centimeters of additional snowfall. temperaturewise we're looking at los angeles 14 degrees, houston down to 8 from 25 yesterday. please do bundle up. oklahoma city at minus 4 degrees. just -- that's well below your average. let's now head toward the european continent. and talk about the very windy conditions in northeastern germany. we have been seeing wet and unstable conditions there. the temperatures are very cold, too. berlin at 9 degrees. but take a look at what people in berlin did yesterday, on tuesda
in the united states of america. that is something that has to be different. one other point about new town. dillon shockley was six-years old. he was a special education student. his parents issued a statement. we take great solace that dylan died in the loving arms of his favorite teacher, the speal education teacher, anne marie murphy. the teachers in that school, the principal, psychologist, the teachers that die protecting their children, saving their children, comforting their children, those who survived, they are true heroes and they have not received the recognition, in my judgment, that they deserve. i point out that every one of them is a public-school teacher, a group that has been condemned, vilified, and denigrat by all sorts of people. i do wonder about this nexus we are making about mental illness and violence. we have had a number of gun violence in the district of columbia where people have been killed by firearms, prince george's county as well. are you suggesting to me that everyone who pulled a trigger is mentally ill? is that the suggestion? >> no. >> in mass killings,
. sometimes there were even weddings, and some of our young women ended up going to america. >> at the 11-kilometer mark, we find the vineyard of spiro scarlatina is, who says that this kind of grave was being made here as far back as the battle against the persians, but even a victorious past like that is of little avail to the winegrower -- this kind of grape. >> wine used to be in national temple in greece, but it has become a luxury. after -- how can people who have seen their wage cut by half still afford a glass of wine? >> but he is not ready to throw in the towel just yet. he hopes the marathon label might help his selection of wines find fans abroad. at a fruit and vegetable stand at the 18-kilometer mark, we meet a 22-year-old egyptian who fled to greece four years ago. since then, he has held his uncle growing and selling vegetables. he also works in a tire workshop here, but there have been more and more racist attacks in athens, and now, he avoids the capital. >> i have not experienced any racism out here. it is quiet. of course, for immigrants, life is not easy during a cris
of responsibility because of the position you hold now around the world to introduce the world to latin america and music? >> oh, absolutely, of course. but look, for us the most important thing is to put our music in the same level of how to say, of importance, as bthoven, as or nono, especially talking about modern composers. because when we talk about our music we are talking about music of the 20th century. especially 20th century and that is the important thing. can't you imagine, i was thinking this this is all new music for many people, you know. the concerts are sold out. you know, it's somethg very scialecause people are coming with this kind of question, you know, with this kind of what we will listen. but i think at the same time they think that will be something very special. and for us the most important thing is not of course it's the orchestra, but its music. how important is this music, to bring this music for people that are not close to th. >> rose: how was it founded? >> it was founded by maestro antonio, in 1975, i think, started as a program for young musician. we have a gr
, every family in america will see their income taxes automatically go up on january 1. i mean, i... i'm assuming that doesn't sound too good to you. >> no. >> that's sort of like the lump of coal you get for christmas. that's a scrooge christmas. >> warner: in washington, republicans portrayed the road trip as so much humbug, at a time, they said, when negotiations are going nowhere. >> there's a stalemate. let's not kid ourselves. >> warner: house speaker john boehr said republicans remain willing to raise revenues, but not by raising tax rates. and he charged the white house isn't negotiating in good faith. >> the day after the election, i said the republican majority would accept new revenue as part of a balanced approach that includes real spending cuts and reforms. now, the white house took three weeks to respond with any kind of a proposal, and much to my disappointment, it wasn't a serious one. >> reporter: that proposal was presented by treasury secretary timothy geithner yesterday to congressional leaders. it was widely reported today that the white house offer called for: $1
. there have been north of 300,000 layoffs. you have seen it at u.b.s., bank of america, which is strug ling with the own acquisitions. you have even seen it at goldman sacs, one of the winners after the financial crisis. it's actually, if you talk to these bank c.e.o.s they will tell you it's a difficult time to run a multinational bank. even with the bailout, and interest rates of 0 for four years, even when they offer you and me nothing on our savings and checking accounts they say in their own defense, we're dealing with unprecedented regulation. we have to curb proprietary trading. we have regulators breathing down our neck and it's hard to earn an extra buck in that environment. you're seeing citi, in fact, address those concerns in the layoff announcement today. >> ifill: what does that tell bus the health of the banking sector and whether other big banking institution might be following suit? >> citigroup is not as mump an indicator species as i think people would want it to be. 15 years ago, it was the financial supermarket. it rolled everything together. it's one-stop shopping, and
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